CAA USA distributing Secubit GSC Gun Shot Counter for Glocks

Sec-ubit-courtesy-commandarms.com_

CAA USA is now distributing the Secubit GSC Gun Shot Counter for Glocks (which I will just refer to as a GSC). Secubit is an Israeli firm which manufactures GSCs for the Glock and picatinny-rail-equipped rifles. It costs $100 for the Glock Gen3 version.

I’ve noticed a lot of whining online about “why would you need this?” I think it’s a rather useful tool for setting and complying with a maintenance schedule, not to mention understanding your shooting habits in more detail (such as split times). Whether it’s a hundred bucks useful… the jury is out. It would be a no brainer to me at a quarter of the price, but I’d need to be using it on a serious-competition race gun to justify spending a hundred bucks on it. I think there’s real merit in computerized statistics for firearms, and would like to see more hardware innovation in this area.

(H/T to TTAG!)

Uzi Pro Pistol Coming Soon (supposedly)

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RoverDave, a well-respected mod at the UziTalk forum, has posted that the Uzi Pro Pistol will be shipping in “2-4” weeks. If this pans out, we should be seeing Uzi Pro Pistols in stores by mid-to-late July. Sig brace versions will apparently follow “shortly after”, although I suspect “shortly after” might be “never”, given the recent BATFE statements on the braces.

You’ll recall that the Uzi Pro Pistol has an MSRP of $1109, so street prices will most like be around $900 once initial demand comes down. This is a lot of money, but the original Action Arms Uzi Pistols still sell for $1250 or more on Gunbroker, so there may be a market. I know I’m planning on picking one up!

A Review of the Negev NG7

While I would probably take any review from a national defense industry publication with a grain of salt, I just found an older article from Israel Defense that reviewed the new-ish 7.62×51 Negev NG7. Spoiler alert: they liked it a lot.

But, in fairness, the NG7 sounds like a hell of a gun. The NG7 is lighter than an M249 SAW, while packing a significantly bigger punch (7.62×51, instead of 5.56×45) and being far more comfortable to carry and hold.

The Mystery of the IMI 9mm Revolver

One of the most maddening Israeli-made handguns to track down has been the “IMI Revolver 9mm”. There is simply very little reliable information about it floating around on the internet due to its age and lack of commercial imports.

There are conflicting accounts of what caliber the revolvers were chambered in (9×19, .38 Special, or 9×21), whether they were based on the S&W 1917 design or S&W Model 10 design, and whether they were ever produced in any real volume. (All sources agree that they used half-moon clips, which at is something, I guess.) Internet legend has it that the Israelis made them for the Palestinian Authority’s police units after favorably evaluating the 9mm S&W Model 547 (a different gun entirely), but the total lack of them in imported Israeli police seizure lots is baffling, if that is true. I have spent some time researching the issue, and I think I’ve got a better theory as to what’s going on.

Continue reading The Mystery of the IMI 9mm Revolver

Importer Politics: Magnum Research, Charles Daly / KBI, and BUL

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One of the more sordid corporate firearms-related stories revolving around the Internets has to do with how the Charles Daly / KBI firm was ultimately bankrupted when an Israeli manufacturer, Bul Transmark, decided to screw them in favor of Magnum Research.

The story is interesting, and perhaps not well-remembered today, so I thought I’d write about it.

Continue reading Importer Politics: Magnum Research, Charles Daly / KBI, and BUL

Updates to the Kareen article

I’ve been doing some research and made some updates to the Kareen MkII article. For what I believe to be the first time on the Internet, I have detailed all six variants of the Kareen that made it to the United States.

I had been erroneously treating the “Kareen MkIII” and the “KA-MkIII” as the same gun. On detailed inspection of photos, it’s very clear that they have significant differences. The Kareen MkIII was an attempt to lower the manufacturing costs of the Kareen MkII. The KA-MkIII, on the other hand, looks exactly like an Arcus 94. I don’t want to claim I’ve solved the mystery, but I think my best guess now is that KSN was using rough Arcus frames and slides to produce the Mk II and Mk III, and then switched over to finished frames and slides for the KA-MkIII.

In other news, I have acquired a whole bunch of Israeli handguns, including a coupler rarer ones, and I hope to have some articles on them beginning in May.

Want a compact Israeli handgun? Buy soon.

While reviewing the product catalogs from Magnum Research and IWI-US, I noticed that neither of them are going to be importing the “compact” versions of either the BDE III or the Jericho. Perhaps they don’t feel these guns can compete in the concealed-carry marketplace? Assuming that Magnum Research drops the BDE II line, there will no longer be an option for a compact-size Jericho on the market.

Battle Ready International, however, did mention to me that they were trying to import the BUL M-5 Ultra-X, so there may be some hope in the future. The BUL M-5 Ultra-X will no doubt be expensive, but it is arguably the best choice out there for an “officer”-size double stack 9mm 1911.

Please note, though, that MR and IWI-US will both be releasing “semi-compact” guns that feature a shorter barrel/slide with the same-sized grip. These are perfectly fine guns, but many find them less usable for concealed carry due to the long(er) grip.