Category Archives: Reviews

Running and Gunning with the Tavor

I had the opportunity to take a carbine class with Green Ops recently, and because I am an iconoclast and easily influenced by my friends, I ran it with my stock Tavor. (Not to worry, I had my IDF-style Colt Commando in my trunk as a backup.) This was the first time I had ever really run the Tavor hard, and I’ve got some new feelings about the platform. Optic, for reference, was the Mepro RDS, which worked great and I have no complaints about.

The only big issue I had with the Tavor in class is reloading speed. I’d argue that the problem is not really getting the old magazine out (I’m a mag ripper by temperament), but rather getting the bolt back into battery. The bolt release is just in a really awkward place, so you either wind up hitting it (which is slow and awkward) or racking the CH (which is a touch-slower but less awkward). The X95 seems to have a better design on this front, but it’s still not that hot due to the bolt release being roughly the same concept (albeit moderately improved). I am going to shake down a buddy of mine with an X95 to see how I feel about it.

The factory trigger is also not great for first-round precision due to how heavy it is, but has a really great reset. If I wanted to spend the money on a Geissele pack, this would be a non-issue IMHO. As it is, you’ve got to be a touch slower and more deliberate to make the trigger do what you need it to do. But important thing here: it can do the job.

Switching shoulders during a barricade drill was not a problem due to the case deflector. Yeah, brass flying in front of your face is a theoretically bit unsettling, but if it doesn’t hit you, who cares? I was so totally focused on the drill I barely even noticed.

I did not love the full-length trigger guard. My rifle was slung a little too low, and I could not see the pistol grip. Ordinarily, this would not be a big problem, but I had to be exceedingly careful to not accidentally grab the trigger. In a gun with a traditional trigger guard, I would not have had this concern quite as much.

Finally, I did not love the sling situation on the Tavor. I prefer running the Magpul single point slings when I need to shoot dynamically, and the Tavor is not set up for that out of the box. The GHW Flex Swivel apparently does a reasonable job of providing a way to do this, but they were out of stock everywhere when I was looking for it last month.

Now, all of this said, the gun ran with utter reliability, on a diet of cheap steel-cased ammo to boot. No failures, no stoppages, no failures to lock back, etc. This was true of the other Tavor in the class as well. Really, the only problem was that I ran slower, and I think further practice doing reloads would have alleviated that to some degree. The problem, of course, is that practicing reloads on traditional-format guns that take AR mags makes me faster on all those guns… practicing on a Tavor just makes me faster on a Tavor. Not a problem if you’re a grunt in the IDF, but if you’re an enthusiast in the US, it’s something of a conundrum.

 

Advertisements

FAB Defense PLR Light Mount Review

IMG_1550

One of my projects of late has been putting weapon lights on my various rifles. This has been a much larger undertaking than I gave it credit for… the advent of LED lights and relatively high-quality Surefire clones has really created a fascinating market. While I’ve mostly been putting old Surefire M-series lights on the rifles, I’ve also been exploring mounting hand-held lights on my SBRs, where a larger light makes less sense (and a Surefire Scout is way too expensive).

To that end, I’ve been looking into the appropriate mounts. There are a lot of them out there, and some are made by CAA and FAB Defense. In this review, I’ll be looking at the FAB Defense PLR light mount. More after the break.

Continue reading FAB Defense PLR Light Mount Review

The El-Op Eyal Scope

IMG_1508

One of the really neat things about collecting Israeli firearms and accessories is that the Israelis surplused tons of neat stuff. While I haven’t seen any surplus Israeli reflex sights come on the market yet, there are a bunch of Eyal and Nimrod scopes floating around out there. I was recently able to get my hands on an El-Op Eyal scope. The Eyal is a “M16 carry handle”-style scope of the type that was popularized by the old Colt 3x and 4x scopes.

I’d like to share my thoughts about it!

Continue reading The El-Op Eyal Scope

FAB Defense FBS / RBS Backup Sights

IMG_1477

Backup sights are a controversial issue these days. There are an increasing number of shooters who feel that the current crop of military-grade reflex and prism sights (Aimpoints, Trijicon ACOGs, etc.) are tough enough and reliable enough that backup sights are no longer useful – that is to say, any event that’s traumatic enough to destroy an ACOG is probably not going to leave behind an intact rifle.

To my knowledge, most militaries still embrace backup sights as an essential. About the only first-rate military I’ve ever seen field optics without backup iron sights is the IDF – you can find plenty of pictures online of optics deployed on flat-top M16s without a rear backup sight..

Therefore, I assume FAB Defense developed the FBS / RBS backup sights for export. I have a 9mm AR-15 that needed some backup sights, and the FBS / RBS seemed like an interesting option. How did I like it? More after the break.

Continue reading FAB Defense FBS / RBS Backup Sights

The Elbit Falcon Optical Gunsight MkII

 

IMG_1494The reflex sight is arguably one of the most important recent developments in small arms technology. I’ve read assertions thatĀ first round hit probability is tremendously increased with the proper use of reflex sights, especially on moving targets, and I’m certainly inclined to agree. Aimpoint was the first manufacturer to create such sights, but a company that followed closely behind them was Elbit Systems of Israel, who created the Falcon optical gunsight.

I was able to acquire a Falcon reflex sight recently, and had a chance to put it through its paces. More after the break!

Continue reading The Elbit Falcon Optical Gunsight MkII

The BUL Storm Compact

IMG_1408

One of the guns that I always assumed was a bit of a unicorn was the BUL Storm Compact. According to some information I had read on a previous auction of one, only 300 were ever produced. However, as I posted on the blog, about a dozen of the guns went on sale on Gunbroker over a short time period last year, and I was lucky enough to snag one.

Unfortunately, my state of residence takes forever to put a gun on our handgun roster. And what’s worse, the Storm Compact that I bought had an undiscovered broken magazine release, so it had to take two trips through that process. So, despite having bought the gun quite a long time ago, I’ve only really had it in my hands for a month or so, and I wasn’t even able to get the magazine that came with it.

That’s been enough time for me to formulate some thoughts on the gun, though. Read on for more.

Continue reading The BUL Storm Compact

LaserAmmo SureStrike 9mm Cartridge

IMG_1375

I have never been a particularly good shot. By that, I mean that I know my flaws. I know that I tend to get pumped up and lose fundamentals. I enjoy shooting; it gives me an adrenaline rush. But, in the end, fundamentals are everything when it comes to accuracy.

My research online indicates that the top pistol-shooting competitors out there supplement their range time with dry-fire practice. Sensible enough, but I like immediate feedback. Practicing badly doesn’t get me any better! Laser training cartridges have become more popular for this purpose. After reading some mixed reviews of the longevity of the LaserLyte 9mm training cartridge, I opted for the well-reviewed – and Israeli-made Laser Ammo SureStrike 9mm Cartridge.

Continue reading LaserAmmo SureStrike 9mm Cartridge