Tavor 7 Accuracy Issues Cause Delay

Interesting news from IWI on Facebook:

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I suspect they’re sensitive to accuracy after the related concerns with the X95. Still, this gives us a nice picture of what’s presumably an almost-production rifle in black… not a fan of the brake, but looks great otherwise!

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Green Ops Defensive Carbine Clinic AAR (Galil Edition)

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Shanah tovah!

So, I have been less active posting to the blog because I’ve been buying less and doing more. This is not a bad state of affairs, but can admittedly be on the boring side of things if you’re the reader of an Israeli firearms blog! (It also didn’t help that IWI hasn’t released any of their new guns yet… so much for release dates.)

One of the things I’ve been doing more of is training. Training is a tough commitment, but I’m in a place in my life where I’m finally in condition to do more of it, and I’ve been trying to make a priority of it. Finding good trainers is hard – most of them seem content to do CCW courses and “your first gun!” classes. There’s nothing wrong with those, but when you want more advanced training, you’re either looking harder or traveling.

I am very pleased to say that Green Ops in northern Virginia is one of those real-deal advanced training providers, and they’re worth every penny you throw their way. I’ve taken a number of courses with them, and this after-action review is for their Defensive Carbine Clinic.

Continue reading Green Ops Defensive Carbine Clinic AAR (Galil Edition)

Update on the Tavor 7, TS12, Masada Ship Dates

IWI-US posted an update to their website today about the release dates for the Tavor 7 rifle, TS-12 shotgun, and Masada handgun:

TAVOR® 7 – Shipping to retailers beginning mid-July, with full-production quantities coming within 60-90 days. Initial offering will be limited to T716B (Black) with T716FDE (Flat-dark Earth) and T716ODG (OD-Green) coming in 2019.
TAVOR® TS12 Shotgun – Shipping to retailers beginning mid-fourth quarter. Initial offering will be limited to TS12B (Black) with TS12FDE (Flat-dark Earth) and TS12ODG (OD-Green) coming in 2019.
MASADAPistol – Full-production quantities to begin shipping to US retailers beginning in January 2019.

So, basically, we’ll see a bit of the Tavor 7 in a month, the TS12 around Thanksgiving, and everything else in 2019. This is not surprising, but it is still disappointing. Keep saving those shekels, I suppose.

Running and Gunning with the Tavor

I had the opportunity to take a carbine class with Green Ops recently, and because I am an iconoclast and easily influenced by my friends, I ran it with my stock Tavor. (Not to worry, I had my IDF-style Colt Commando in my trunk as a backup.) This was the first time I had ever really run the Tavor hard, and I’ve got some new feelings about the platform. Optic, for reference, was the Mepro RDS, which worked great and I have no complaints about.

The only big issue I had with the Tavor in class is reloading speed. I’d argue that the problem is not really getting the old magazine out (I’m a mag ripper by temperament), but rather getting the bolt back into battery. The bolt release is just in a really awkward place, so you either wind up hitting it (which is slow and awkward) or racking the CH (which is a touch-slower but less awkward). The X95 seems to have a better design on this front, but it’s still not that hot due to the bolt release being roughly the same concept (albeit moderately improved). I am going to shake down a buddy of mine with an X95 to see how I feel about it.

The factory trigger is also not great for first-round precision due to how heavy it is, but has a really great reset. If I wanted to spend the money on a Geissele pack, this would be a non-issue IMHO. As it is, you’ve got to be a touch slower and more deliberate to make the trigger do what you need it to do. But important thing here: it can do the job.

Switching shoulders during a barricade drill was not a problem due to the case deflector. Yeah, brass flying in front of your face is a theoretically bit unsettling, but if it doesn’t hit you, who cares? I was so totally focused on the drill I barely even noticed.

I did not love the full-length trigger guard. My rifle was slung a little too low, and I could not see the pistol grip. Ordinarily, this would not be a big problem, but I had to be exceedingly careful to not accidentally grab the trigger. In a gun with a traditional trigger guard, I would not have had this concern quite as much.

Finally, I did not love the sling situation on the Tavor. I prefer running the Magpul single point slings when I need to shoot dynamically, and the Tavor is not set up for that out of the box. The GHW Flex Swivel apparently does a reasonable job of providing a way to do this, but they were out of stock everywhere when I was looking for it last month.

Now, all of this said, the gun ran with utter reliability, on a diet of cheap steel-cased ammo to boot. No failures, no stoppages, no failures to lock back, etc. This was true of the other Tavor in the class as well. Really, the only problem was that I ran slower, and I think further practice doing reloads would have alleviated that to some degree. The problem, of course, is that practicing reloads on traditional-format guns that take AR mags makes me faster on all those guns… practicing on a Tavor just makes me faster on a Tavor. Not a problem if you’re a grunt in the IDF, but if you’re an enthusiast in the US, it’s something of a conundrum.

 

FAB Defense KPOS G2 Follow-Up Thoughts

I’ve been shooting the FAB Defense KPOS G2 a little further on my Glock 17 lately, and I have some follow-up thoughts and findings.

First: it’s not compatible with iron sights that go forward of the rear sight cut, to include many, many of the fiber optic sights out there such as the Tru-Glo TFX. I have not tried it with suppressor sights.

Second: I tried using my Tactical Solutions TSG-22 22lr conversion with it. The conversion sits slide sits low enough that I would be VERY concerned about striking the “compensator shroud”. You could, in theory, remove the shroud to make it work correctly, which might be a viable alternative in some setups. The charging handle mechanism is also a little suspect with it, but it does seem to work. I might experiment with this more later on if I have time.

Third: an extended magazine release helps a lot with this setup. I highly recommend one.

Fourth: it seems like your gun gets very dirty VERY quickly in this enclosure. My front night sight was blacked out after a few magazines of shooting..

Finally: I am still concerned about this gun’s ability to retain a true zero due to the slight up-down movement that you can get with the flexing of the frame. My groups are larger than I would have expected, albeit this is when shooting at 25yds with trash ammo. Now, the truth is, since the front of the gun is latched in pretty good, it might look worse than it is, since the back is going to show a larger flexing due to variance. Still, it’s not what i would call a precision weapon compared to a “real” rifle. It does seem to more-or-less hold zero between taking the gun in and out of the chassis, though.

How to Fix Compensator Problems on Your Glock

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The compensator in question.

So, in an effort to align content with my current activities, I’d like to talk about my recent experience with putting a compensator on my Polymer80 940C not-a-Glock build, hereon described as my Compact Fauxland Special (CFS). It was built with a Brownells slide with RMR cut, LWD frame parts kit, BCA threaded barrel, Glock slide parts kit, and a TLR-2. After a bit of lube, it was fully-functional and reliable.

I decided to get clever and add a TBRCi stubby compensator to my CFS… and that it where my problems all began.

Continue reading How to Fix Compensator Problems on Your Glock

Gone, but not forgotten!

Hey, folks – sorry for being quiet the past couple months. I have been exceedingly busy with work, other real life projects (learning MongoDB, 3D printing firearms, taking gun training classes, reloading), and TBH, the news on the Israeli gun has been rather quiet. The Tavor 7, Masada, and TS12 are still awaiting street release, so there’s not going to be a lot to report news-wise until people get their hands on them.

That said, I’ll try to find some time to write up a couple more reviews on some Israeli parts and accessories I’ve picked up recently.

I have been pondering a change of direction for the blog. I’d still like the focus to be on Israeli small arms and accessories, but I would probably have a lot more to write about if I added in the other gun-related stuff I’ve been working on. So, you’d still see a lot of Israeli stuff, but maybe more from my other interests. I’m still deciding on whether I want to do that-  there’s value in focus.